Samoyed Health

 

 

 

THE SAMOYED CLUB OF VICTORIA HEALTH INFORMATION PAGE

The Samoyed Club of Victoria have adopted a Code of Ethics for Breeders. We are working to encourage responsible and ethical breeding practices. A health sub-committee has been formed and work has commenced on this page to bring you some important health information.

The Samoyed as well as many other large breed dogs, can be subject to some hereditary problems which are inherited problems passed from a parent to a puppy. These problems include hip dysplasia and several eye diseases. Most conditions have complex causes and are the result of many different contributing factors.  Environmental factors in hip dysplasia are weight, the amount of exercise given and what type of exercise also as well as the growth rate of a puppy. 

Below we have provided links to information that we feel is of value and important to read and learn from. More information on various topics will be added to this page on a regular basis.

SCV CODE OF ETHICS FOR BREEDERS

The Samoyed Club of Victoria Code of Ethics for Breeders adopted in 2015.
 

PUPPY BUYER CHECKLIST

We have provided a form with questions for prospective puppy buyers to ask breeders when you make contact and also questions you may be asked by the breeder.

This is a guide only but will give you an idea of what to ask when making an enquiry about purchasing your puppy.

All breeders who are member of the Samoyed Club of Victoria follow our Code of Ethics for Breeders, you can view a copy via the link on this page.

QUESTIONS TO ASK THE BREEDER

 

PUPPY HEALTH CHECK FORM

We have provided a form which can be taken to the Breeder’s Vet for completion before a puppy goes to its’ new home indicating that the Vet has performed a general health check of the pup.

CLICK HERE FOR PUPPY HEALTH CHECK FORM

EARLY DE-SEXING

Please take the time to read the information on the following websites. Early de-sexing is no longer recommended by all breeders for some of the reasons you will read about on these sites. Talk to the breeder of your puppy about this subject.

Dogs First Website: Dog Neutering: The Unspoken Risks of Neutering Early

http://www.dogsfirst.ie/health-issues/dog-neutering/

Dogs Naturally Website: Spay Neuter and Joint Disease by Dana Scott

http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/spay-neuter-and-joint-disease/

Dogs Naturally Website: Early Spay Neuter: 3 Reasons To Reconsider

http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/three-reasons-to-reconsider-spayneuter/

Dogs Naturally Website - Long-Term Health Risks and Benefits Associated with Spay / Neuter in Dogs

http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/long-term-health-risks-benefits-spay-neuter-dogs/

Angry Vet Website: Spaying and Neutering Questions & Answers

http://www.angryvet.com/spaying-and-neutering/

Healthy Pets Website: Why I've Had a Change of Heart About Neutering Pets by Dr Karen Becker

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2013/09/30/neutering-health-risks.aspx

Truth For Dogs Website: Spaying and Neutering: New Warnings About Health Problems

http://www.dogs4dogs.com/blog/2015/02/03/spaying-and-neutering-new-warnings-about-health-problems/

Canine Sports Website: Early Spay-Neuter Considerations for the Canine Athlete: One Vet’s Opinion

http://www.caninesports.com/uploads/1/5/3/1/15319800/spay_neuter_considerations_2013.pdf

BLOAT

“Bloat” a.k.a. Gastric Dilatation Volvulus (GDV) kills an estimated 60,000 dogs each year.  It is most prevalent among bigger breeds, with apparent correlation to deep-chested dogs, including Samoyeds.

The following Potomac Valley Samoyed Club web page provides a case study and some interesting information

http://www.potomacvalleysams.com/Article_Bloat_and_Samoyeds.html

PORTOSYSTEMIC SHUNTS/LIVER SHUNTS

A portosystemic shunt (PSS) is an abnormal connection between the portal vascular system and systemic circulation. Blood from the abdominal organs which should be drained by the portal vein into the liver is instead shunted to the systemic circulation by the PSS.

American College of Veterinary Surgeons - short explanation

https://www.acvs.org/small-animal/portosystemic-shunts

Listen as Dr. Karen Becker discusses the problem of liver shunts – what they are, what causes them, and what to do if you suspect your pet has the condition.

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2011/02/01/liver-shunts-disease-in-pet-dogs.aspx

AKC - Researchers Study Ways to Diagnose Liver Disease Sooner – is about Cocker Spaniels but worth a read.

http://www.akcchf.org/educational-resources/library/articles/articles/cockerspanielupdate0707.pdf

SAMOYED EYE CONDITIONS

An interesting article my Melbourne Eye Vet re eye conditions found in Samoyeds by Dr. Chloe Hardman BVSc (Hons) MVS, MANZCVS (Small Animal Surgery) FANZCVS (Ophthalmology)

http://www.melbourneeyevet.com.au/uploads/6/1/2/2/61228653/samoyed_article_for_website_and_newsletter_copy__1_.pdf?fbclid=IwAR2lzMCrLP6V3Js45Pveex4QSghRqATv3aH42wNnknCBrLKM3pyM5O8ybWk

The AVA-ANKC Australian Canine Eye Scheme ANNUAL BREED SUMMARY REPORT

July 2017 to June 2018

http://ankc.org.au/media/9242/aces-breed-summary-2018-final-worksheet_29-6.pdf

CANINE FAMILIAL ENAMEL HYPOPLASIA

Some information regarding this condition which can affect Samoyeds.

https://www.azvetdentists.com/index.php/vet-dental-services/crowns-a-restorative-dentistry/124-enamel-hypoplasia-in-pet-teeth

http://veterinarynews.dvm360.com/dental-enamel-defects-dogs

https://wagwalking.com/condition/enamel-hypoplasia

https://www.dentalvets.co.uk/common-cases/enamel-dysplasia-in-dogs